Jeddah Blog

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Archive for the tag “tourism”

1001 Nights Persian Rug Educational Tour


Welcome back after a hot and humid summer! If you are new to the Kingdom, or simply settling back in after the holidays, make sure you visit the blog regularly and bookmark us for lots of local activities, workshops and tours.persian rug

Join this free guided tour in English shedding light on history, making and craftsmanship of Persian rugs. Learn how to identify an antique rug, quality and how to select the perfect rug for your space, care and the story behind the rug. Our exquisite spokesperson comes from a family with generational history in the art of trading rugs.

Date: September 3rd, 2015.

Time: 9:30am to 11:30am

Venue: Hindawiya District-Bukhari Street

Cost-None

For further details and registration, visit the event page on Facebook.

Artisans of Love: Hidden Jewel Tour Series


Arabian Jewel is organising an exclusive visit to Saudi Arabia’s most exclusive interior designer. The pictures below speak for themselves.

Arabian Jewel Tour, JeddahGuided tour
A treasure cove for art and design enthusiasts. Displaying art, interior design, exclusive fabrics, unique furniture and an unmatchable ambiance. Find out from the artist himself what inspires his work, how to integrate stylish interiors and find your personal decor style in your space.

Arabian Jewel Tour 2Hidden Jewel Speaks
“My inspiration is driven from the hidden soul and beauty that relies in all my surroundings. The warmth of desert sand dunes, the calmness of the sea, the rigidness of stones and musical rhythms of nature… Anything that triggers the senses, and challenges the thought.”

Arabian Jewel Tour 3

Date: 12 November at 10:45–12:30

Unique Opportunity
Meet with the artist
Ask questions
Shop for unique interiors
Discover beauty in the heart of Jeddah
Arabian Jewel Tour 4

Register your interest on this event page.

First 6 to RSVP will be granted tour pass
LIMITED audience: 10 participants max
RSVP: By November 7th
All confirmed attendees will be privately emailed map and directions

Stay three nights in a Radisson Blu Hotel in Saudi Arabia and enjoy an exciting one night stay in Dubai


Radisson Blu

Summer for the Radisson Blu Hotels has always been the season for big opportunities and exciting experiences. The 2014’s summer season isn’t absolutely an exception. Radisson Blu, one of the world’s leading brands located in different prime locations including major cities, airports, gateways and leisure destinations around the world launched for this summer a special offer for its customers in KSA allowing many of them to enjoy the Radisson Blu’s hospitality and relaxation.

If you are planning to stay for three nights in one of the Saudi Arabian Radisson Blu Hotels then be ready to win a free weekend night in Dubai. The lucky winners will enjoy the charm of a unique experience that combines world-class travel with unprecedented personal service that will make every guest feel both comfortable and taken care of thanks to the attentive hospitality and high quality service.

Haven’t you decided yet where to stay in KSA? There is no need to be confused. All you have to do is to click on the following link: www.radissonblu.com/ksahoteldeals and get your hotel booked in one of the most special places in Saudi Arabia. Once the booking is validated for three nights then you will have a certain opportunity to win a free night stay in Dubai for an astonishing experience that will certainly mark your summer.

– Sponsored by Radisson Blu

Arabian Jewel Embrace Culture Initiative: Ramadan Nights in Balad


Come, come whoever you are… expat, bedu, merchant or royal…

Balad’s enticing yearly Ramadan Festivities await you. Experience Ramadan by visiting Balad with your friends and family on the day(s) of your choice.

Historical Balad Cultural Initiative

Photo credit: Helmy Saggaf

Dates

1-RAMADAN EXPERIENCE
Daily 1st Ramadan to 20th Ramadan
10pm to 2am

2-EID EXPERIENCE
Daily 25th of Ramadan to 5th *Shawwal
10pm to 2am

Location: Historic Balad District (please see map)

Please note:

1) This is not a guided tour.

2) No charges, no entry fee, no tour fees. This is open to ALL at NO COST.


Come, come, whoever you are,
Wanderer, worshiper, lover of leaving.
It doesn’t matter.
Ours is not a caravan of despair.
Come, even if you have broken your vows
a thousand times.
Come, yet again, come, come.
(Jalauddin Rumi)

Arabian JewelThank you to Arabian Jewel in cooperation with Jeddah’s Heart, for bringing us this event. You can visit the event page for further details.

*Shawwal: month following Ramadan.

Camel Cuteness: Souvenirs from Jeddah


Having been in Jeddah town for around five years now, and having gone back at least eight times, I was fast beginning to feel like I had exhausted all options for my ‘Arab souvenirs’. Friends and families back home had had just about enough of our regular take-homes of assorted dates and fancy nuts from Roasters. Most of the souvenir shops at Jarir Mall and Red Sea Mall were drastically over-priced.

When I come back to Jeddah, I often bring back traditional stuff for my Arab colleagues, something deeply traditional, with a strong feel of place, like Ajrak-printed bedsheets, embroidered cushion covers, and winter shawls.  It leaves them elated and asking for more. I was looking for something along those lines, something that makes a very strong statement without necessarily inducing bankruptcy.

As they say, if you’re not a Muggle, magic finds a way to happen. So, where do I hit upon this goldmine of cuteness? In the departure lounge at the airport. Yes, apparently a new or a very recent addition, because I did not see this before, a brand called The Camel Company, which operates from Dubai UAE, has a whole range of souvenirs including notebooks, pens, wallets, cups, decorative plates, cushion covers, key chains, mouse pads, coasters, fridge magnets, paper weights and such.

The motifs are very Arab with a strong dash of color and spunk. The most refreshing part is definitely the colour palette, with bright and deep colours that just leap off the racks and beg purchase. The images for the brand are mostly clichés of the Arab landscape and way of life, but they are very artfully appropriated for a fun effect. They would have to be Arab in the broadest sense of the word, not necessarily Saudi per se, but I don’t think the benefactors of these souvenirs would be overly fussy about that.

Camels and more camels

Camels and more camels!

I don’t know what takes the cup for cuteness, the multi-hued camel with the drooping lower lip, the palm-sized Bedouin girl and boy in authentic Bedouin costume, the mosque sprouting out of desert ground on a set of coasters, the notebook with the ornate calligraphy or the fridge magnets that look like little jewels. For the moment, they look like they’re all winning, and I’m taking them all!

 

Walking Tour of Balad


Jeddah in 1938

Jeddah in 1938. Source: http://www.wikimapia.com

IEF Center in collaboration with Nomad invites you to a

Walking tour of Balad

Date:  Saturday, November 16, 2013
Place:  Balad, Jeddah
Time: 9:00 am – 2:00 pm
Cost: 300 SR per person

Please visit this site for tickets and reservations.

If you wish to register at IEF Center, please confirm by payment at center.

This event is open to men, women and children.

Looking forward to seeing you there.

Summer Breaks – Summer means fun, and the best kind of fun is with Jumeirah


Whether we’re talking about the summer holidays, or the upcoming Hajj break, the standard topic of conversation amongst Jeddawis is where they plan to spend their vacation. According to the Arab News, Saudis traveling abroad last summer were expected to spend a staggering SR40 billion, and Dubai remains the favorite tourist destination among Arab countries for them. 

If you have decided to visit Dubai, but not quite sure where to stay, then read on. Jumeirah Hotels and Resorts are regarded as among the most luxurious and innovative in the world and have won numerous international travel and tourism awards. The Jumeirah portfolio is unmistakable, including 6 stunning  hotels in Dubai; the world renowned Burj Al Arab, the world’s most luxurious hotel, the multi-award winning Jumeirah Beach Hotel, Jumeirah Emirates Towers, Madinat Jumeirah, Jumeirah Creekside Hotel and Jumeirah Zabeel Saray in Dubai and the Jumeirah at Eithad Towers in Abu Dhabi.

The Jumeirah hotels are an excellent choice of hotel and we are here to tell you why.

Summer Breaks – Summer means fun, and the best kind of fun is with Jumeirah

Jumeirah Beach Hotel

Whether exploring the high seas in Sinbad’s Kids Club or enjoying an al-fresco family barbeque at Beachcombers Bar and Grill there is something for every member of the family at the idyllic family resort of Jumeirah Beach Hotel. While enjoying their sun-drenched beaches, sculptured swimming pools and manicured landscaped grounds you can relax safe in the knowledge that your loved ones are receiving the highest standards of hospitality and care.

Added value to customers and benefits

Don’t we all love a great deal and lots of complimentary benefits? From 10% off their Best Available Rate with a host of value-added benefits. The rate starting from AED 800 includes many exclusive complimentary benefits such as the complimentary breakfast.

 Complimentary exclusive private beach access

Situated in the vibrant city of Dubai, you can enjoy their stunning 2km golden beach nestling next to their beach-side properties or just a short, free shuttle bus service from their City hotels. If you are staying at the opulent Jumeirah Zabeel Saray you will also have access to an exclusive private beach on The Palm Jumeirah.

Complimentary buffet breakfast

As a guest of the JBH, you can take advantage of their bountiful buffet breakfast. From fantastic local cuisine to international favourites, you can be sure of a great start to your day topped off with the immaculate Jumeirah standard we have all come to expect.

Complimentary access to Kids Club

We all know that enjoying time away with your family is often a tale of two cities and it’s important that your loved ones are well taken care of. Sinbad’s Kids Club (Saleem ay JZS), available to guests staying at selected Dubai hotels, offers a safe, fun and friendly environment for your children to explore and make new friends in a closely-supervised environment.

Complimentary access to Wild Wadi Waterpark

Situated next to Burj Al Arab, Madinat Jumeirah and Jumeirah Beach Hotel, the Wild Wadi Waterpark is a Dubai legend with sample speeds of up to 80km per hour slide down the Jumeirah Sceirah. For the more adventurous, get a taste for the rocketing power of the Master Blasters or for those more laidback, enjoy a leisurely float along the Lazy River. There is always more than one helping of fun to have at Wild Wadi with the two thrilling rides: Tantrum Alley incorporates two large sections of downhill waterslides and three exciting tornadoes. Guests seated on a tube will travel downhill to enter the first tornado where they slide back and forth several times, then circle around and around in the eye of the storm before exiting and hitting the second and thirds tornados, after which you splash out into the pool.

The equally adventurous Burj Surj consists of two large sections of downhill waterslides and the looming ‘Bowl’. Guests are seated on a tube, travelling downhill to the bowl, where they are hurtled into two spiralling spins and then dropped into the slide, ending with a screaming splash in the pool.

Complimentary Internet access

We at Jeddah Blog know the importance of staying connected online while away on vacation. Whether to peek in at work, or to stay in touch with your family and friends, all of their Dubai hotels offer free in-room Internet access so you can make sure that you are never out of touch.

How do I book a place?

Make your dreams a reality, and book your next holiday online here.

Or call:

Dubai 800 JUMEIRAH (800 5863 4724)

Saudi Arabia 800 897 1439
* IDD rates apply

Or email:

reservations@jumeirah.com

Prices vary from property to property. Check the prices online. It is 10% off Best Available Rate. Burj Al Arab is offering 25% off their Best Available Rate.


Go ahead, book your vacation now and drop us a note to tell us all about your amazing holiday!

The Wonders of Madain Saleh (part 1)


Saudi Arabia is home to many beautiful sites, but due to the lack of active tourism (or certainly not enough of it), these areas are generally unknown. Madain Saleh is one of those wondrous places which is a pre-Islamic archeological territory and Saudi Arabia’s first ever World Heritage Site.

Typically Madain Saleh is not easily accessible as permissions from relevant authorities need to be taken before embarking on the journey, but our regular contributor and intrepid traveler Naima Bashir was not to be discouraged. She made the journey with her family, and sent us a detailed report and pictures.

In this first blog post of the series, we’ll bring you her journey from Jeddah to Al Ula, and then on to Madain Saleh. In subsequent posts, Naima will tell us about her visit to the Hijaz Railway, the Castle of Moosa Bin Nusair, Old Al-Ula and the Hill Station.

We had Madain Saleh on our list for a very long time but could not gather the energy for a road trip with small children. But last month, we were determined to give it a try. It is 817 km north of Jeddah, around 8 to 9 hours drive from Jeddah. The journey is a lot easier if you go via Madina and stay the night there.

Entrance gate of the World Heritage Site (UNESCO).

Entrance gate of the World Heritage Site (UNESCO).

There is an alternative road through Yanbu, but it’s not very comfortable and safe. So we decided to choose the road through Madina, with our trusty GPS leading the way.

Did you know? Saudi Arabia has 4,000 archeological sites!

On our way we saw camel signs very frequently. This was to alert us to drive carefully, as these splendid animals are likely to walk into the middle of the road.

perfect view of the old and new Al Ula and the same time

View of Old Al-Ula city from Moosa Bin Nusair’s fort.

To reach Madain Saleh we needed to stay in a town called Al Ula, which is situated right next to the site. There are many furnished apartments and hotels available for tourists to stay. Al Ula is a small town and I found it very peaceful. We arrived around 7 p.m. and discovered that it is forbidden to go to the site after or around Maghrib prayer (sunset). We had to wait until the next day to go to Madain Saleh.

madain 1

Distant view of the tombs carved from the mountains.

The next day we left the hotel and were fascinated to see that the town was all rocks and mountains. We were excited to learn that not only was Al Ula host to the remains of Nebatean era, but also to remains of the mosque where Prophet Mohammad (peace be upon him) stayed for a night before setting out for the historial Battle of Tabuk. In addition, we were told that Moosa Bin Nusair’s Fort, the railway station of the Turkish Empire and remains of old Al Ula could also be visited.

madain 3

A closer view of the tomb. Initially, we thought it was a house made of bricks and plaster, but this is all carved.

In fact, this piece of land is full of historic places. Just to be clear, the Nabataen remains are of the same people of Thamud who have been mentioned in the Qur’an quite frequently.

every carved simbol represents and says some thing.

Every tomb had different carvings like flowers, birds and animals on top of the door. This one was decorated with a carved skull.

The World Heritage Site is out of town but easy to reach. I was told that you need to attain some kind of permission, but on arrival, we were told that for some reason we did not any permission for some days.

graves carved in side the tombs

Graves carved inside the tombs.

The Site is a combination of two eras, firstly the Nabateans around 160 BC and secondly the Turkish Empire. The remains of the Hijaz railway station from Turkish Empire that was used for trade and to transport pilgrims from Syria are still there.

Madain Saleh

Madain Saleh, also known as Al-Hijr, dates back to the Nabataean Civilization and is considered to be one of the most important archaeological sites in Saudi Arabia. It is called The Capital of the Monuments as it contains a huge number of diverse and multifaceted monuments. At first glance, it looks like a vast ground with a huge rock in it, but when you look carefully, those rocks have been carved into shapes of tombs and graves. The levels of these graves vary depending on the level of social and financial status of their owners. People settled in this area due to the suitable climate and the availability of fresh water in the area.

These houses did not have many carvings as they belonged to common citizens.

These houses did not have many carvings as they belonged to common citizens.

The monuments surround the residential area and contain 111 monumental tombs, ninety-four of which with decorated facades varying considerably in size. Thirty tombs bear a dated Nabataean inscription incised in a special frame above the door of the funerary vault. They define who was allowed to be buried within the tombs, and indicate the fine to be paid by those who did not obey the rules listed in the text. Inscriptions engraved on rocks, facades of graves and mountains allude to the existence of civilizations that had prevailed and fallen in the area where architecture and sculpture flourished. Every grave facet represents a cemetery for one family.

The Diwan.

The Diwan.

The Diwan, or the Muslim Council Chamber, is in and around Jabal Ithlib, in the north-eastern part of the archaeological park. Jabal Ithlib is the highest sandstone outcrop of the site and can be seen from as far as al-‘Ula. The internal part of the Jabal may be reached through a narrow passage between high rocks, some 40 m long which can be compared, although much smaller, with the Sîq of Petra.

The stream that poured water from the mountains into the well underneath.

The stream that poured water from the mountains into the well underneath.

At the entrance of this pass, to the right, is carved, the so-called Dîwân room, in fact a  triclinium where groups of people used to have meals together in antiquity. Around Jabal Ithlib, on the outside, are several carved small Nabataean sanctuaries.

Nabatean inscriptions detailing who the tomb was built for.

Nabatean inscriptions detailing who the tomb was built for.

Most of the niches, altars, betyls (carved sculptures) and other religious monuments are associated with Nabataean inscriptions, sometimes dedications, but most often signatures of the worshippers who came to worship their deity there during the Nabataean period.

If you liked this article, you may like:

A Weekend Getaway to Thuwal Beach

The Mad Traveler Comes to Jeddah

Medina Mint


If you’ve been to Medina, you’ve surely stopped at the little vendor-cart right on your way back, and purchased your little bouquet of mint – the handful of sparkling green goodness, that blast of aroma that takes you straight to heaven, and that inimitable, indefinable, unnameable hue of green that makes everything else seem dull. If you’ve seen it and smelled it, you’ll agree with us that the little green beauty deserves a post all to itself.
There’s more to it than meets the eye, or the nose, because apart from staring at it and smelling it, you can use it in a million different ways as well. So, tell us, what do you do with your mint from Medina, and help us compose our final ode to it.

Do you grind it in an aromatic chutney to go with fried snacks? Do you simmer it in a teapot and sip the light golden liquid? Or do you like it cold? Do you give it a whirr in the blender with a dash of lemon and whizz through your day? Do you mix it up with chocolate and bake sinful goodness out of it?

Mint icecream with chocolate. An irresistable combination.

Do you rev up your biryani with some leaves? Do you tie it up with a fancy ribbon, tuck it in an Ikea vase, and use it as an object of beauty? Do you scatter it in a platter with other petals? Do you dry its twigs out in the sun and brew it like ancient medicine?

Mint  chocolate brownies.

 Tell us what the mint from Medina means to you. Is it perfume, is it cure, is it zest, is it a hint or the whole flavor, or just plain eye candy? Write in and tell us, send us pictures if you want. Your contributions mean a lot to us.

The Mad Traveller Comes to Jeddah!


Paul Hudspith, British Airways cabin crew member, has been making videos of his travels every week since 2004. Paul always travels with his (very cool) Brompton foldable bicycle, cycling even under the sweltering sun of Saudi Arabia. The Mad Traveller’s videos can be found on his YouTube channel bromptonglobetrotter

While Paul had already been to Riyadh earlier in 2011, he most recently made a video on his visit to Jeddah where he talks about the scorching weather, the beautiful architecture, the open-air art museum around the Corniche and his visit to Balad. We were very lucky to catch hold of Paul and speak to him about his travels, his videos and his visit to Jeddah. 

Paul, you work for British Airways. Is this what inspires your love of travelling?

I’ve worked as a cabin crew with BA for nine years now and yes, the job does inspire me a lot but it’s mainly exposure to nature programmes as a young child that really gave me a huge appetite to explore the wider world around me. The job is really more of an excellent tool to enable many of my dreams to become a reality.

Paul's first camera operator and fellow Couchsurfer member, Mo.

Paul’s first camera operator and fellow Couchsurfer member, Mo.

Of all the Mad Traveller videos you’ve made around the world, which is your favourite?

I’ve been making videos ever since my first trip as crew – which was to Warsaw, Poland on an extremely cold winters’ day in January 2004. Since that first not-so-confident presentation, I’ve developed my shows to the programme format you’ve seen.

Choosing a favourite is always tricky but I would say my top three are: Hong Kong, San Francisco and Tokyo. India is also a fascinating place.

Paul's second camera operator and fellow Couchsurfer member Toni Riethmaier.

Paul’s second camera operator and fellow Couchsurfer member Toni Riethmaier.

You mentioned some myths and preconceptions about Jeddah in your video. What surprised you the most?

The myths and preconceptions I mentioned referred to Saudi Arabia in general and I would say that the biggest surprise so far has been how amazingly peaceful the cities are. There’s an eerie sense of calm everywhere you go. The allowing of men to wear shorts also came as a surprise.

A visit to the Gold Souk. Paul buys gold on his visit to Jeddah.

A visit to the Gold Souk. Paul buys gold on his visit to Jeddah.

Your favourite part of Jeddah?

My favourite spot in the city was the coast (Corniche) – beautiful clear waters and an easy ride along the shore line, and some very quirky public displays of art!

Cycling along the Corniche.

Cycling along the Corniche.

How long did it take you to film the video?

The video took around 6 hours to produce and included the time it took to cycle from Jeddah airport to the hotel. The second half was then filmed in the evening.

Presenting on the Corniche.

Presenting on the Corniche.

 How did you come to choose Jeddah as one of your destinations?

It wasn’t solely my idea to come to Jeddah – I was rostered to operate the flight as crew. I’m randomly rostered to fly to an average of  any 4 global cities served by BA from London per month which could be anywhere in North or South America, Asia, Africa or the Middle East.

And finally, here is the final Mad Traveller video, This Week in Jeddah:

A Weekend Getaway to Thuwal Beach


A regular week in Jeddah can be quite routine, yet hectic at the same time. Weekends are an opportunity to get out of the bustling city, breathe in some fresh air and recharge one’s batteries. Jeddah Blog writer Naima Bashir recently visited Thuwal with her family, a village some 80 kilometers North of Jeddah along the Red Sea. Thuwal is known for its fishing, and is home to KAUST, the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology. Naima was kind enough to share her experience and even sent us photographs of their trip.

We had been trying to take out time from the busy life for a family trip to a beach for a long time, where there would be less rush, the water would be clean, and not to forget we could get enough space for the car parking.

We set out looking for a peaceful place to spend the day.

We set out looking for a peaceful place to spend the day.

So this Thursday we managed to arrange a trip to Thuwal beach. It is about an hour’s drive, 80 km north from Jeddah. It is not difficult to find as you can easily follow directions on the highway. When you reach the bridge before the Madina exit, on the bridge you’ll see the signboard saying Thuwal and pointing towards the left.

Plenty of space to park one’s car.

Plenty of space to park one’s car.

We reached there around 2 pm which was perfect as the weather was not yet hot, and people had only just started arriving. The place was exactly what I was looking for. Gorgeous sea water, a clean place to sit, and enough space for parking. You can even find huts there if you prefer some privacy.

Fresh air, blue sky, warm waters and soft sand. An ideal place for children to run and play.

Fresh air, blue sky, warm waters and soft sand. An ideal place for children to run and play.

My kids loved paying in the sand. They got the chance to make beautiful sand castles and water streams leading from the sea.

Sandcastles and water streams.

Sandcastles and water streams.

They spent a lot of time in the blue water. The water near the shore is not deep. It is quite shallow, so you don’t have to worry about your children venturing out into the deep water. There are children’s play areas too.

A signboard announcing a soon-to-be-opened water park. We can't wait!

A signboard announcing a soon-to-be-opened water park. We can’t wait!

Washrooms are available, although due to the lack of signage you’ll have to hazard a guess on whether it is a ladies or gents washroom. This was the only thing I did not like. It is hard to find a public place with clean washrooms.

Thuwal 6

Firing up the barbecue.

The location was ideal for a barbecue; you can plan a visit with all of your family friends and enjoy a delicious barbecue under the clear blue sky, along with the wonderful weather.

Thuwal is an established fishing center.

Thuwal is an established fishing center.

Living in Jeddah you desperately look for a place where you can find peace and where the kids can have fun. Thuwal beach is an ideal place for a family fun day, away from the city rush. If you haven’t visited already, make sure it’s on your must-do list.

Have you experienced a great weekend in or near Jeddah? Write to us and let us know.

Ever Wondered About The Tomb of Eve (Hawwa)?


Jeddah (or Jiddah) means grandmother in Arabic, and the city is named thus due to the belief that the tomb of Eve or Hawwa lies within this city. The tomb is known as Maqbara Hawwa and is not openly advertised to the public. Guest blogger Delina Partadiredja who writes regularly for aMuslima.com visited the site and reported back to Jeddah Blog.

According to the Koran, Torah and Bible, Adam and Eve did not follow the commands of God to abstain from the forbidden fruit. As a consequence, after being tempted by the devil, they were commanded by God to come down to Earth.

Where did Adam and Eve come on Earth for the first time? Although there are various opinions on the topic, it is cited in Ad-Dur Al Manthur, (Ibn Abbas R.A) that Adam, Eve, Satan and the snake fell at a place called Dajnah, which is between Makkah and Ta’if. Other books claim that Adam landed at Al-Safa while Eve landed at Al-Marwah; the two hills in Makkah where the Sa’i is performed during Umrah in the Grand Mosque. Another source mentions that Adam landed in India while Eve landed in Jeddah and Adam looked for Eve in Muzdalifah (where the stoning ritual is performed during Hajj).

Signpost for The Tomb of Eve, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, KSA

The signpost reads Muqbara Hawwa in Arabic, which means ‘The Tomb of Eve’.

Jeddah means ‘grandmother’ and according to Arab traditions, it is believed that the mother of all human beings (Eve) was buried in Jeddah. Eve’s burial location has not been publicised, but a few years ago I visited the site that is believed to be the tomb of Eve. The place is located near the mosque of Qisash heading toward Balad around the old Jeddah. The public cemetery has no headstones, thus no can tell where exactly Hawwa was buried. This is to prevent people from turning a cemetery into a sacred place for pilgrimages or to engage in Shirk (Polytheism) by asking for blessings and favours from the dead; something that is prohibited in Islam.

Door to Tomb of Eve, Hawwa, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, KSA

The door to the Tomb of Eve. Benches have been placed within.

Her tomb is about 3 metres long and whitewashed. Before being destroyed, the tomb of Eve was about 120m long, 3m wide and 6m high. For those who want to visit the place, people are usually only allowed to stand at the front door of the tomb (this was previously coloured green). Visitors are prohibited inside the tomb and the open doors are guarded to prevent entry.

The tomb was said to be originally almost 400 feet long and that Eve was one hundred and eighteen feet tall.

References: Atlas of the Qur’an by Dr. Shauqi Abu Khalil

Special thanks to Delina Partadiredja for writing for us, and to Zareen Muzaffar for her help in editing this piece.

Caving Trip to Umm Jirsan


The Arabian Treks Team are organizing a 2 day Caving Trip to Umm Jirsan Cave on 31 January 2013. The cave is 620 km north of Jeddah in a volcanic and rocky area that is defined by its underground caves that were created thousands of years ago as a result of volcanic eruptions. It is one of the largest caves in the Middle East. Participants will be caving, camping and stargazing and fees include an individual dome-style tent, all full meals, drinks and snacks.

The floor is composed of evenly-spaced “domes” of hard mud

The floor is composed of evenly-spaced “domes” of hard mud

Photo credit: http://explorecavernsnow.com/caverns/umm-jirsan-saudi-arabia/

The costs are SAR 750 if you require transportation, or SAR 600 if you are driving your own SUV. The last date for joining is 26 January 2013.

For further details contact info@ArabianTreks.com, call Mazin on 0566660530 or you can visit their Facebook event group.

Jeddah Corniche Renovated


Jeddah Blog reader Muhammad Abdul Nasir, has visited the newly-renovated Corniche which has been updated at a cost of SR 185 million, and has captured the following scenes for us. Have you taken a trip to the seaside lately? What do you think of the improvements? Leave a comment and let us know.

Corniche 1

The new railing ensures safety without compromising the view of the sea.

Corniche 2

An area for families to sit, relax and enjoy the natural beauty of the sea.

Corniche 3

The newly-constructed parking area, surrounded by well-lit trees, grass and lighting.

Corniche 4

The footpath built for pedestrians to enjoy the view and an evening walk can be seen here.

Sunset at the Jeddah Corniche.

Sunset at the Jeddah Corniche.

– Courtesty M.A.N. Photography

Historic Balad Tour


Experience Balad like never before!

Your True Nature is organizing their third historic tour of Balad on the 13th of January, 2012. This is a professional tour service for expats and it includes a 4 hour tour, presentation, food and visit to a museum. The cost per person is SR 275.

The tour is open to families and you will probably want to take your cameras along to take photographs of the beautiful old buildings and streets of Balad. “This is our third successful tour of Balad and it is vital for our cultural awareness to learn about the heritage and culture of the land we are living in”, says Alicia of Your True Nature. She goes on to add, “Jeddah, and this region in particular, goes back to the beginning of time. It is significant to the history of mankind. However, with little emphasis on heritage,  we miss out on a lot. Recent discoveries tell us that this region houses Mount Sinai. So Balad is just a starting point of activating an interest in the rich history of this land.”

If you would like to attend this unique tour, send your confirmations to essentialfitra@yahoo.ca including your name, contact number and total number of participants.

A video link of their last tour can be viewed here.

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